Alternative Learning System

History

Alternative Learning System delivers basic educational services to the depressed, disadvantaged and underserved people. It is also an instrument in making available to disadvantaged out-of-school children, youth and adults access to opportunities for self-enhancement and employment. These groups are the targets of ALS and need our attention, so that we will develop an economically, socially and politically participating people.

It is a parallel learning system in the Philippines that provides a practical option to the existing formal instruction. When one does not have or cannot access formal education in schools, ALS is an alternate or substitute. ALS includes both the non-formal and informal sources of knowledge and skills.

Basic to people empowerment are knowledge, skills and attitudes/values. Their potential may still be untapped, locked behind the fear of failure which intimidates many and prevents them from aiming higher. The chains can be broken by a better knowledge of education, serious reading and by never letting the sun set on a day without adding to their knowledge and the world around them.

Alternative Learning System remains a viable government thrust and important tool to progress.

Vision

The Bureau of Alternative Learning System envisions itself to be the leading producers of Filipino lifelong learners.

Mission

In partnership with other producers of learning, the Bureau of Alternative Learning System will develop exemplary programs and open creative learning opportunities to achieve multiple literacy for all.

Objectives

ALS aims to open more educational opportunities for Filipino citizens of different interests, capabilities of demographic characteristics, socioeconomic origins and status as well as addressing the needs of marginalized groups. The program cuts the time needed to finish high school, hence, significantly cuts the expenses as well. Aside from giving hope to the less fortunate, it also provides opportunities for Out-of-School Youths and adults elementary and secondary school drop-outs; industry-based workers; housewives; maids; factory workers; drivers; members of cultural minorities; indigenous people; and the disabled and physically challenged.